When I first got into the car business in the late 80's, the term Margin Compression was something relating to industries other than Auto. Back in those days, a dealer normally had a 60-90 day period to maximize their gross profit. Unfortunately those days are...

Blame - assign responsibility for a fault or wrong. Most dealership personnel will associate the term Reconditioning with Time-to-Line, although TTL involves much more than the normal "mechanical and cosmetic" processes. When I was in the dealership, the majority of the reconditioning of a used vehicle was...

Dealers who have the most efficient reconditioning time consistently average three to five days from recon start to front line. They also know where every car is at all times because every step has a clear owner who is connected to it through their mobile...

In our first of three articles discussing how to drive time and cost wastes out of the reconditioning process, we took a look at how lean manufacturing workflow principles when applied to automotive reconditioning, improves outcomes. That article outlined the fundamental processes for how to move...

Vehicle reconditioning is an essential process for every used car department. It not only gets vehicles ready for consumers’ eyeballs, but when it gets them frontline ready fast, it can mean more gross on every sale. Every used car manager knows this intuitively. I’m not sure,...

Ideally, every dealership should be able to manage used car reconditioning at a four- to five-day level, independent of volume. Some exceptional stores are able to operate in a three-day range by keeping service at a four-hour average and detail/photos to an eight-hour average. To...

Buyers for pre-owned cars are spending money again, and across the country dealers are feeling cautiously optimistic about this continuing. At the same time, the online competitive landscape demands new ways of reaching buyers through search powerhouses, like AutoTrader.com, Cars.com and, now, Google. With all...